Tag Archives: personal finance

Loose Leaf for Personal Finance

Decisions students make today can affect not only their life now but have an impact on their future. If students make wise financial decisions, life can become a more joyous experience. On the other hand, if students make bad decisions, life may not turn out so well. Personal Finance was written with one purpose: To provide the information students need to make informed decisions that can literally change their life. The 13th provides the information needed to take advantage of opportunities and to help manage their personal finances.This new edition of Personal Finance is packed with updated information and examples to help students plan for the future and achieve financial security. For example, we have revised important topics like taxes, college loans, health care, and investments to provide the most current information available. Other important topics including credit, housing, legal protection, retirement planning, and estate planning have also been revised in this edition.

Get a Financial Life: Personal Finance in Your Twenties and Thirties

A completely revised and updated fourth edition of the New York Times bestseller, designed to guide younger adults through the world of personal finance.More than ever before, people in their twenties and thirties need help getting their financial lives in order. And who could blame them? These so-called millennials have come of age in the wake of the worst economic crisis in memory, and are now trying to get by in its aftermath. They owe record levels of student loan debt, face sky-high rents, and struggle to live on a budget in an uncertain economy. It’s time for them to get a financial life. For two decades, Beth Kobliner’s bestseller has been the financial bible for people in their twenties and thirties. With her down-to-earth style, she has taught them how to get out of debt, learn to save, and invest for their futures. In this completely revised and updated edition, Kobliner shares brand-new insights and concrete, actionable advice geared to help a new generation of readers form healthy financial habits that will last a lifetime. With fresh material that reflects the changing digital world, Get a Financial Life remains an essential tool for young people learning how to manage their money. From tackling taxes to boosting credit scores, Get a Financial Life can show those just starting out how to decrease their debt, avoid common money mistakes, and navigate the world of personal finance in today’s ever-changing landscape.

Personal Finance For Dummies

Take stock of your financial situation From budgeting, saving, and reducing debt, to making timely investment choices and planning for the future, Personal Finance For Dummies provides fiscally conscious readers with the tools they need to take charge of their financial life. This new edition includes coverage of an extensive new tax bill that took effect in 2018 and the impact on individuals, families, small businesses, and on real estate and investing decisions. Plus, it covers emerging investing interests like technology and global investing, cryptocurrencies, pot stocks, the lifestyle changes occurring with millennials, and more. Evaluate and manage your financial fitness Assess your credit report and improve your score Make smart investments in any economic environment Find out about international investing The expert advice offered in Personal Finance For Dummies is for anyone looking to ensure that their finances are on the right track―and to identify the areas in which they can improve their financial strategies.

The Psychology of Money: Timeless lessons on wealth, greed, and happiness

Doing well with money isn’t necessarily about what you know. It’s about how you behave. And behavior is hard to teach, even to really smart people.Money―investing, personal finance, and business decisions―is typically taught as a math-based field, where data and formulas tell us exactly what to do. But in the real world people don’t make financial decisions on a spreadsheet. They make them at the dinner table, or in a meeting room, where personal history, your own unique view of the world, ego, pride, marketing, and odd incentives are scrambled together.In The Psychology of Money, award-winning author Morgan Housel shares 19 short stories exploring the strange ways people think about money and teaches you how to make better sense of one of life’s most important topics.